Regulatory Authority
Regulatory Authority
Scope of Assessment
Regulatory Fees
Ethics Committee
Ethics Committee
Scope of Review
Ethics Committee Fees
Authorizing Body
Clinical Trial Lifecycle
Submission Process
Submission Content
Timeline of Review
Trial Initiation
Safety Reporting
Progress Reporting
Sponsorship
Definition of Sponsor
Trial Authorization
Insurance
Compensation
Quality, Data & Records Management
Site/Investigator Selection
Informed Consent
Documentation Requirements
Required Elements
Compensation Disclosure
Participant Rights
Special Circumstances/Emergencies
Vulnerable Populations
Children/Minors
Pregnant Women, Fetuses & Neonates
Prisoners
Mentally Impaired
Investigational Products
Definition of Investigational Product
Manufacturing & Import
IMP/IND Quality Requirements
Labeling & Packaging
Product Management
Specimens
Definition of Specimen
Import & Export
Consent for Specimens
Canada
QUICK FACTS
Clinical trial application languageEnglish or French
Parallel regulatory and ethical review permittedYes
Clinical trial registration requiredNo
In-country sponsor presence/representation requiredYes
Age of minorsDetermined by Province
Specimens export allowedYes
Regulatory Authority > Regulatory Authority
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As per the CanadaFDA, the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (A), Health Canada (HC) is the competent authority responsible for clinical trial approvals, oversight, and inspections in Canada. The G-CanadaCTApps states that the HC grants permission for clinical trials to be conducted in the country, and regulates the sale and importation of drugs for use in clinical trials in accordance with the CanadaFDR provisions.

As per Additional Resource (A), HC is one (1) of five (5) federal agencies within Canada’s “Health Portfolio” overseen by the Minister of Health. Per Additional Resource (B), HC assesses clinical trial protocols to evaluate participant protection and safety; reviews drug quality; assures institutional ethics committee review; verifies principal investigator qualifications; and monitors and reviews adverse drug reactions. As delineated in Additional Resource (C), HC’s Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) is the national authority that regulates, evaluates, and monitors therapeutic and diagnostic product safety, efficacy, and quality, and reviews the information submitted in the clinical trial application.

HPFB’s activities are carried out by seven (7) Directorates including the Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD) and the Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD). Per Additional Resources (E) and (F), the TPD and the BGTD, respectively, regulate pharmaceutical drugs and medical devices, and biological drugs and radiopharmaceuticals for human use. In addition, Additional Resource (F) and the G-CanadaCTApps indicate that the TPD’s Office of Clinical Trials (OCT) and the BGTD’s Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA), among others, are directly involved with the clinical trial review and approval process for pharmaceutical, biological, and radiopharmaceutical drugs.

Contact Information: Drug Clinical Trials
Office of Clinical Trials
Therapeutic Products Directorate
5th Floor, Holland Cross, Tower B
Address Locator: 3105A
1600 Scott Street
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1A 0K9

Phone: 613.941.2132
Fax: 613.946.7996
General Enquiries E-mail: OCT_BEC_Enquiries@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Notifications E-mail: OCT_BEC_CTA-N-DEC@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Site Information Forms E-mail: clinical.trials.site@hc-sc.gc.ca

Contact Information: Biologic Clinical Trials
Office of Regulatory Affairs
Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate
100 Eglantine Driveway
Address Locator: 0601C
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1A 0K9

Phone: 613.957.1722
Fax: 613.946.9520
General Enquiries E-mail: BGTD_ORA@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Notifications E-mail: BGTDPBTG.CTANDEC@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Site Information Forms E-mail: BGTDPBTG.CTSIFILEC@hc-sc.gc.ca

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Health Portfolio (Last Updated September 4, 2014)
Government of Canada

(B) (Website) Drugs and Health Products - Background: Food and Drugs Act and Regulations (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – How Drugs are Reviewed in Canada (Last Updated December 15, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: What is the Health Products and Food Branch?

(D) (Website) About Health Canada – Health Products and Food Branch (Last Updated March 14, 2016)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(E) (Website) About Health Canada – Therapeutic Products Directorate (Last Updated February 27, 2014)
Therapeutic Products Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(F) (Website) About Health Canada – Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (Last Updated November 17, 2011)
Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(G) (Website) Drugs and Health Products - Overview of the Clinical Trial Application Process (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(H) (Website) Health Canada, Office of Clinical Trials (OCT), Contact Us (Last Updated October 21, 2013)
Office of Clinical Trials, Therapeutic Products Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(I) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Contact Information (Last Updated March 29, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Legislation) Food and Drugs Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. F-27) (CanadaFDA – English and French) (Amended November 6, 2014)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Part II (Section 30 (1.2))

(2) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.002, C.05.005, and C.05.006))

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2, 1.4, 2.1, and Appendix 1

Regulatory Authority > Scope of Assessment
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDA, Health Canada (HC) reviews, evaluates, and approves applications for clinical trials using authorized therapeutic products. HC also approves the sale or importation of drugs for use in clinical trials. (See the Investigational Products topic, Manufacturing & Import subtopic for additional information on importation.)

Per the CanadaFDR, a “therapeutic product” is defined as a drug or device, or any combination of drugs and devices, but does not include natural health products; “therapeutic product authorization” refers to a license that is approved for the import, sale, advertisement, manufacture, preparation, preservation, packaging, labeling, storage, or testing of a therapeutic product. As per the G-CanadaCTApps, HC’s scope of assessment includes clinical trials (Phases I - III) using:

  • Drugs not authorized for sale in Canada in development and in comparative bioavailability studies, and
  • Marketed drugs where the proposed use of the drug for one of the following is different: indication(s) and clinical use; target patient populations(s); route(s) of administration; or dosage regimen(s)

In addition, as delineated in the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, institutional ethics committee (EC) review for each clinical trial site may occur in parallel with HC’s clinical trial application (CTA) review and approval. Once HC completes its review, the department issues a No Objection Letter (NOL) if the CTA is approved. However, per the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (C), HC will not authorize the sponsor to begin the clinical trial until he/she submits an institutional EC approval (provided in the required Clinical Trial Site Information form) for each participating trial site. (See the Ethics Committee topic, Scope of Review subtopic for more information)

Clinical Trial Review Process
As set forth in the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resources (A) and (B), HC’s Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) coordinates the CTA approval process. The G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resource (B) state that prior to initiating the trial, the sponsor must file a CTA to the appropriate HPFB Directorate. CTAs involving pharmaceutical drugs should be sent to the Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD), and CTAs involving biologics and/or radiopharmaceuticals should be sent to the Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD).

The G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resource (B) indicate that upon receipt of a CTA, the HPFB Directorate (TPD/BGTD) screens the application package for completeness. If deficiencies are found, the Directorate sends the sponsor a Request for Clarification or a Screening Rejection Letter. If the Directorate finds the application complete, an acknowledgement letter is issued to indicate the 30-day default review period commenced on the date of receipt.

Per the G-CanadaCTApps, once a clinical trial is authorized, the sponsor is allowed to sell or import a drug for use in a trial, if a CTA has been filed with HC and has not received an objection within 30 days. As delineated in the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resources (A) and (B), if the clinical trial is authorized, an NOL is issued. If the CTA is rejected, a Not Satisfactory Notice (NSN) is issued. As specified in the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resource (B), during the review period, the Directorate may request additional information from the sponsor, who has two (2) calendar days to provide such information. Please see the G-CanadaCTApps for special requirements regarding reviews of comparative bioavailability studies and joint reviews of clinical trials covering a combination of devices, biologics, and pharmaceuticals. See the Clinical Trial Lifecycle topic, Submission Process subtopic for detailed application submission requirements.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Drugs and Health Products - Overview of the Clinical Trial Application Process (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – How Drugs are Reviewed in Canada (Last Updated December 15, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section:  What is the Health Products and Food Branch?

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Clinical Trial Site Information form

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Legislation) Food and Drugs Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. F-27) (CanadaFDA – English and French) (Amended November 6, 2014)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2 and Part II (Section 30 (1.2))

(2) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.002, C.05.005, and C.05.006))

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2, 2.1, 2.3, 2.7, and Appendix 1

Regulatory Authority > Regulatory Fees
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
According to Additional Resource (A), there are no fees to submit a clinical trial application in Canada.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Frequently Asked Questions – Filing of Clinical Trials (Last Updated February 21, 2008)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Question 5

REQUIREMENTS

No applicable regulatory requirements

Ethics Committee > Ethics Committee
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As indicated in the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, Canada has a decentralized process for the ethical review of clinical trial applications, and requires the sponsor to obtain institutional ethics committee (EC) approval for each participating trial site. (Note: institutional ECs are referred to as Research Ethics Boards (REBs) in Canada.) Canadian provinces may have varying requirements, and, therefore, the sponsor should consult with its applicable province(s) for more information. Institutional ECs are required to comply with the provisions delineated in the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs).

In addition to mandatory compliance with the CanadaFDR and the CA-ICH GCPs, institutional ECs are guided by the G-TCPS2. The G-TCPS2 is an ethics policy jointly developed by Canada’s three (3) federal research agencies: the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). Per the G-TCPS2 and Additional Resource (B), the G-TCPS2 sets the ethical benchmark for all Canadian institutional ECs. However, only CIHR-, NSERC-, and SSHRC-funded institutions are required to comply with this guideline as a condition of funding. According to Additional Resource (B), the CIHR, the NSERC, and the SSHRC created the Interagency Advisory Panel on Research (PRE) to promote the ethical conduct of research involving human participants, and the PRE develops, interprets, and implements the G-TCPS2.

Per the G-TCPS2 and Additional Resource (D), institutions specifically funded by HC or the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) must obtain approval from a joint EC representing those two (2) agencies—as well as complying with the CanadaFDR and the CA-ICH GCPs. This joint EC is the HC-PHAC REB. The HC-PHAC REB must review and approve all human research studies carried out by, performed by, or otherwise under the auspices of HC or PHAC. Further, if an institution is conducting an HC- or PHAC-funded project, the HC-PHAC REB must review and approve the research even if it has been previously reviewed and approved by another EC. See Additional Resource (D) for details on the HC-PHAC REB’s development, responsibilities, and composition.

In 2010, Health Canada (HC) issued an operational policy (Additional Resource (E)) to outline policies and procedures that the joint HC-PHAC REB must follow when reviewing clinical trials. Further, HC sponsored a national EC standard (Additional Resource (C)) that is essentially identical to HC-PHAC operational policy.

Institutional EC Composition
As delineated in the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and the CA-ICH GCPs, institutional ECs must have at least five (5) members representing a mixed gender composition, the majority of which are Canadian citizens or permanent residents, and must include:

  • Two (2) members from a scientific discipline, with broad experience in the relevant research methods and areas, one (1) of whom is from a medical or dental discipline
  • One (1) member knowledgeable in ethics
  • One (1) member knowledgeable in relevant Canadian biomedical research laws
  • One member from a nonscientific discipline
  • One (1) community representative

The G-TCPS2 mirrors these EC composition requirements. As mentioned earlier, only CIHR-, NSERC-, and SSHRC-funded institutions are required to comply with this guidance as a condition of funding.

Terms of Reference, Review Procedures, and Meeting Schedule
Institutional ECs
According to the CA-ICH GCPs, institutional ECs must establish written standard operating procedures (SOPs) to cover the entire review process. The SOPs should include EC composition, meeting schedules, notifications, frequency of reviews, protocol deviations, reporting to the EC, and recordkeeping. Further, ECs should make decisions at announced meetings where a quorum is present. Only those members who participate in the EC review and discussion should vote, provide their opinion, or advise. For detailed EC procedures and information on other administrative processes, see the CA-ICH GCPs. In addition, for examples of EC SOPs, see Additional Resource (E) for the HC-PHAC REB operational policy.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Foreword, Introduction, 1.24, 1.27, 2.6, 3, and 5.11

(B) (Website) Panel on Research Ethics – Navigating the Ethics of Human Research (Last Updated August 4, 2016)
Panel on Research Ethics, Government of Canada

(C) (Standard) Research Ethics Oversight of Biomedical Clinical Trials (CAN/CGSB-191.1-2013)* (May 2013)
Canadian General Standards Board, Government of Canada
*For purchase only

(D) (Website) Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Research Ethics Board (Last Updated February 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(E) (Standard Operating Procedures) Research Ethics Board’s Operational Policy Framework: Ethics Review of Research Involving Human Subjects (April 1, 2010)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2 and 3

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.002, C.05.005, C.05.006, and C.05.010))

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Introduction, and Chapters 6 and 11

Ethics Committee > Scope of Review
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview

According to the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, the G-TCPS2, and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), the primary scope of information assessed by institutional ethics committees (ECs) (called Research Ethics Boards (REBs) in Canada) relates to maintaining and protecting the dignity and rights of human research participants and ensuring their safety throughout their participation in a clinical trial. ECs must also pay special attention to reviewing informed consent and to protecting the welfare of certain classes of participants deemed vulnerable. (See Informed Consent topic, and the subtopics of Vulnerable Populations; Children/Minors; Pregnant Women, Fetuses & Neonates; Prisoners; and Mentally Impaired for additional information about these populations.)

The CA-ICH GCPs also state that ECs must ensure an independent, timely, and competent review of all ethical aspects of the clinical trial protocol. They must act in the interests of the potential research participants and the communities involved by evaluating the possible risks and expected benefits to participants, and they must verify the adequacy of confidentiality and privacy safeguards. See the CA-ICH GCPs for detailed ethical review guidelines.

Role in Clinical Trial Approval Process
As per the CanadaFDR and the CA-ICH GCPs, Health Canada (HC) must approve a clinical trial application (CTA) and an institutional EC(s) must give ethical clearance prior to a sponsor initiating a clinical trial. In addition, as delineated in the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, institutional EC review for each clinical trial site may occur in parallel with HC’s CTA review and approval. Once HC completes its review, the department issues a No Objection Letter (NOL) if the CTA is approved. However, per the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (C), HC will not authorize the sponsor to begin the clinical trial until he/she submits an institutional EC approval for each participating trial site. The sponsor should use the Clinical Trial Site Information form (see Additional Resource (C)) to submit the required information. The CanadaFDR also states that the EC must review and approve any protocol amendments prior to those changes being implemented.

Further, while the sponsor does not need to submit the REB attestation form to HC, he/she must retain it as a record at the clinical trial site (see Additional Resource (B) to access the form). The EC may use HC’s REB attestation form or develop similar documentation that meets the CanadaFDR requirements. (See the Clinical Trial Lifecycle topic, Submission Process subtopic for detailed submission requirements.)

The G-TCPS2, which sets the ethical benchmark for all Canadian institutional ECs, directs the researcher to submit an annual report to enable the EC to evaluate the continued ethical acceptability of the research. Per the G-CanadaCTApps, in the event that an EC terminates or suspends any prior approval or favorable opinion, it must document its views in writing, clearly identifying the trial, the documents reviewed, and the date for the termination or suspension.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Foreword, 1.27, 2, and 3

(B) (Website) Research Ethics Board Attestation (Last Updated April 8, 2016)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Clinical Trial Site Information form

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.005, C.05.006, and C.05.010))

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2, 1.4, 2.1, 2.5, and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Introduction, and Chapters 1, 6, and 11

Ethics Committee > Ethics Committee Fees
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
Institutionally based ethics committees (ECs) may independently decide whether to charge fees to conduct protocol reviews. For example, an institutional EC may require industry sponsors or other for-profit organizations to pay a fee. See specific examples of institutional fee requirements in Additional Resources (A) and (B).

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Document) University of Calgary CHREB Administration Fee for Industry Sponsored Protocols (May 12, 2014)
University of Calgary, Research Services, Calgary, Canada

(B) (Document) REB Administration Fee for Industry Sponsored Protocols (November 26, 2010)
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Chapter 6 (A)

Ethics Committee > Authorizing Body
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
There are no applicable regulations or guidance regarding the registration of institutional ethics committees (ECs).

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

No additional resources

REQUIREMENTS

No applicable regulatory requirements

Clinical Trial Lifecycle > Submission Process
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 08, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (A), Canada requires the sponsor to obtain clinical trial authorization from Health Canada (HC) prior to initiating the trial. The sponsor must file a clinical trial application (CTA) to the appropriate Directorate within HC’s Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB).

In addition, as delineated in the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, the sponsor may submit a CTA for clinical trial authorization to the HC in parallel with its submission to an institutional ethics committee (EC) (known as a Research Ethics Board (REB) in Canada) for a favorable ethical opinion. However, per the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (B), HC will not authorize the sponsor to begin the clinical trial until he/she submits an institutional EC approval (provided in the required Clinical Trial Site Information form) for each participating trial site.

Delivery Address for Clinical Trial Application
As per Additional Resource (C), CTAs involving pharmaceutical drugs should be sent to the Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD), and CTAs involving biologics and/or radiopharmaceuticals should be sent to the Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD).

Office of Clinical Trials
Therapeutic Products Directorate
5th Floor, Holland Cross, Tower B
Address Locator: 3105A
1600 Scott Street
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1A 0K9

Phone: 613.941.2132
Fax: 613.946.7996
General Enquiries E-mail: OCT_BEC_Enquiries@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Notifications E-mail: OCT_BEC_CTA-N-DEC@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Site Information Forms E-mail: clinical.trials.site@hc-sc.gc.ca

Office of Regulatory Affairs
Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate
100 Eglantine Driveway
Address Locator: 0601C
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1A 0K9

Phone: 613.957.1722
Fax: 613.946.9520
General Enquiries E-mail: BGTD_ORA@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Notifications E-mail: BGTDPBTG.CTANDEC@hc-sc.gc.ca
Clinical Trial Site Information Forms E-mail: BGTDPBTG.CTSIFILEC@hc-sc.gc.ca)

Assembly and Number of Copies
Based on information provided in the G-CanadaNon-eCTD and Additional Resource (D), sponsors must submit CTAs on a disc or drive. HC recommends PDF format, and/or MS-Word (where required) for the CTA. The PDF documents must be generated from electronic sources (not scanned material), no larger than 150 megabytes, properly bookmarked, hyperlinked, and organized in accordance with the Common Technical Document (CTD) specifications in the G-CanadaCTApps and the G-CanadaNon-eCTD. Finally, the sponsor must include a cover letter in both electronic and paper format. (For detailed cover letter requirements, see the G-CanadaNon-eCTD). HC advises sponsors to complete the CTA using the G-CanadaCTApps in conjunction with the G-CanadaNon-eCTD. The G-Canada-CTD also provides detailed CTD format/structure requirements.

Per the G-CanadaNon-eCTD, sponsors should send CTAs directly to the appropriate Directorate within HC’s HPFB in the following media formats:

  • DVD-RAM UDF standard
  • Single and dual layer Recordable Digital Versatile Discs
  • Single and dual layer Blu-ray discs
  • USB 2.0 or 3.0 drive
  • Portable External Hard Drive with USB 2.0 or 3.0 interfaces

In addition, the G-CanadaNon-eCTD indicates that media should not be password protected, and must be provided on a single disc/drive, scanned using virus-scanning software, and certified as virus free. All discs/drives should be labelled with the following information:

  • Sponsor
  • Brand Name of Drug Master File (DMF) Name
  • Dossier Identifier (if known)
  • Control Number or DMF Number (if known)
  • "Protected B"
  • "This media has been virus-scanned and we certify that it is virus free"
  • Month and year of filing

According to Additional Resource (C), as of June 1 2016, HC no longer accepts paper copies of CTAs, CTA amendments, and CTA notifications. See the G-CanadaNon-eCTD, the G-CanadaCTApps, and the G-Canada-CTD for detailed document preparation and submission requirements.

Clinical Trial Application Language Requirements
The CTA may be submitted in English or French.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Overview of the Clinical Trial Application Process (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Clinical Trial Site Information form

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Clinical Trial Contact Information (Last Updated March 29, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(D) (Website) Drugs and Health Products -- Notice: Preparation of Clinical Trial Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (March 2, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

 

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.002, C.05.004, C.05.005)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2, 2.3, and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (G-CanadaNon-eCTD) (February 3, 2016) (Effective Date: September 25, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1-3 and Appendix D

(4) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the Common Technical Document (CTD) Format (G-Canada-CTD) (June 22, 2012)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2-5, and Appendix D

Clinical Trial Lifecycle > Submission Content
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 08, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As set forth in the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (A), Health Canada (HC) requires the sponsor to apply for clinical trial authorization by submitting a clinical trial application (CTA) to HC. The sponsor must also apply to an institutional ethics committee (EC), (known as a Research Ethics Board (REB) in Canada) for a favorable ethics opinion. In addition, as delineated in the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, the sponsor may submit a CTA for trial authorization to HC in parallel with his/her submission to an institutional EC. However, per the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (C), HC will not authorize the sponsor to begin the clinical trial until he/she submits an institutional EC approval (provided in the required Clinical Trial Site Information form) for each participating trial site.

HC Requirements
As specified in the G-CanadaCTApps, the G-CanadaNon-eCTD, the G-Canada-CTD, and the G-QCM-PharmCTAs, the CTA should be organized into three (3) modules in Common Technical Document (CTD) format:

  • Module 1 - Administrative and clinical information about the proposed trial
  • Module 2 - Quality (Chemistry and Manufacturing) summaries about the drug product(s) to be used in the proposed trial
  • Module 3 - Additional supporting quality information

Per the CanadaFDR, the CTA should contain but is not limited to:

  • Protocol
  • Summary of potential risks/benefits
  • Clinical trial attestation (including contact information for each institutional EC that approved the protocol, if EC approval is known at the time of submitting the application)
  • Contact information of any institutional EC that previously refused to approve the protocol, its reasons, and refusal date
  • Investigator’s Brochure (IB)
  • Informed consent form
  • Information about use of a human-sourced excipient
  • Chemistry and manufacturing information
  • Proposed date for trial commencement at each site, if known

Refer to the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaNon-eCTD, the G-CanadaCTApps, the G-Canada-CTD, and the G-QCM-PharmCTAs for detailed submission information and CTD specifications.

Institutional EC Requirements
Each institutional EC has its own application form and clearance requirements, which can differ significantly regarding the number of copies to be supplied and application format requirements. However, the following requirements comply with the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs) and are basically consistent across all Canadian ECs:

  • Clinical protocol
  • Informed consent forms (ICFs) and participant information
  • Participant recruitment procedures
  • IB
  • Safety information
  • Participant payments and compensation
  • Investigator(s) current curriculum vitaes (CVs)
  • Additional required institutional EC documentation

See section 3.1.2 of CA-ICH-GCPs for additional submission content requirements.

Clinical Protocol
As delineated in the CA-ICH-GCPs, the clinical protocol should include the following elements:

  • General information
  • Background information
  • Trial objectives and purpose
  • Trial design
  • Participation selection/withdrawal
  • Participant treatment
  • Efficacy assessment
  • Safety assessment
  • Statistics
  • Direct access to source data/documents
  • Quality control/quality assurance procedures
  • Ethical considerations
  • Data handling and record keeping
  • Financing and insurance
  • Supplements

For complete protocol requirements, see section 6 of CA-ICH-GCPs.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Background: Food and Drugs Act and Regulations (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (Website) Guidance for Completing the Drug Submission Application Form (Last Updated September 2, 2014)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Clinical Trial Site Information form

(D) (Webpage) Research Ethics Board Applications (Last Updated August 15, 2014)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(E) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3 and 6

(F) (Website) Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada’s Research Ethics Board (Last Updated February 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.004, and C.05.005))

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.3 and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (G-CanadaNon-eCTD) (February 3, 2016) (Effective Date: September 25, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1-3 and Appendix D

(4) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the Common Technical Document (CTD) Format (G-Canada-CTD) (June 22, 2012)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2-5, and Appendix D

(5) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Quality (Chemistry and Manufacturing) Guidance: Clinical Trial Applications (CTAs) for Pharmaceuticals (G-QCM-PharmCTAs) (Effective Date: June 1, 2009)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: I, S – Drug Substance, and P – Drug Product

Clinical Trial Lifecycle > Timeline of Review
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 08, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As delineated in the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (A), the review and approval of a clinical trial application (CTA) by Health Canada (HC) and an institutional ethics committee (EC) may be conducted in parallel. However, per the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (B), HC will not authorize the sponsor to begin the clinical trial until he/she submits an institutional EC approval (provided in the required Clinical Trial Site Information form) for each participating trial site. Note: institutional ECs are referred to as Research Ethics Boards (REBs) in Canada.

HC Approval
According to the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, an authorized clinical trial is one that has been filed with HC and has not received an objection within 30 days. All CTAs are subject to the 30-day default period from the date of receipt of the completed application at the appropriate Directorate within HC’s Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB). While the Directorates can establish shorter administrative targets of seven (7) days for the review of bioequivalence trials, the 30-day default system remains the regulatory requirement. Applications to conduct Phase I clinical trials using somatic cell therapies, xenografts, gene therapies, prophylactic vaccines, or reproductive and genetic technologies are not included in the seven-day target system. Please see the G-CanadaCTApps for special requirements regarding reviews of comparative bioavailability studies and joint reviews of clinical trials covering a combination of devices, biologics, and pharmaceuticals.

As specified in the G-CanadaCTApps, during the review period, the Directorate may request additional information from the sponsor, who has two (2) calendar days to provide such information. According to the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resource (A), if HC authorizes the CTA, then it issues a No Objection Letter (NOL). If HC rejects the CTA, it sends a Not Satisfactory Notice (NSN). HC will issue a NSN if it identifies significant deficiencies, or, if a timely response to information requested has not been provided. The sponsor may resubmit the information and material at a future time, and it will be processed as a new CTA.

Soon after HC issues an NOL, it will publish the following information about the clinical trial in HC’s publicly accessible database:

  • Protocol number
  • Protocol title
  • Drug name
  • Medical condition
  • Study population
  • Authorization date
  • Sponsor name
  • HC control number
  • Trial start and end dates, if known

Ethics Committee Approval
The EC review and approval process timeline varies by institution. However, according to the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), the institutional EC should review a proposed clinical trial within a reasonable time. The G-TCPS2, which sets the ethical benchmark for all Canadian institutional ECs, recommends a proportionate approach to ethics review—the lower the level of risk, the lower the level of scrutiny (delegated review); the higher the level of risk, the higher the level of scrutiny (full board review). In either case, pursuant to the G-TCPS2, the institutional EC should make its decisions in an efficient and timely manner.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Overview of the Clinical Trial Application Process (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Clinical Trial Site Information form

(C) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 3.1.2

(D) (Website) Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada’s Research Ethics Board (Last Updated February 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.005 and C.05.006))

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.1, 2.3.3, 2.5, and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.8 and 2.9

Clinical Trial Lifecycle > Trial Initiation
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 08, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (A), a clinical trial can only commence after the sponsor receives authorization from both Health Canada (HC) and an institutional ethics committee (EC) (known as Research Ethics Board (REB) in Canada). No waiting period is required following the applicant’s receipt of these approvals. See the Ethics Committee topic, Scope of Review subtopic for detailed institutional EC requirements, and the Clinical Trial Lifecycle topic, Submission Content subtopic for additional HC approval information.

The CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, the G-CanadaNon-eCTD, and Additional Resource (A) require the sponsor to retain the REB Attestation and Qualified Investigator Undertaking (QIU) forms for each trial site, while submitting the Clinical Trial Site Information (CTSI) form in electronic format to the appropriate HC Directorate for each trial site. See Additional Resources (B) and (C) for all referenced forms. See Clinical Trial Lifecycle topic, Submission Process subtopic for detailed HC Directorate information.

In addition, if a sponsor (Canadian or foreign) wants to import a drug into Canada to conduct a clinical trial, he/she must include a copy of HC’s clinical trial authorization (i.e., the No Objection Letter) with the drug shipment. According to the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resource (D), if a sponsor plans to import investigational drugs directly to each trial site, then the sponsor must also authorize the importer (i.e., the clinical trial site) when submitting the clinical trial application using Appendix I of HC’s Drug Submission Application Form (HC/SC 3011). See the Investigational Products topic, Manufacturing & Import subtopic for detailed import requirements.

Clinical Trial Agreement
Prior to initiating the trial, as delineated in the G-FDR-0068 and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), the sponsor must sign an agreement between all involved parties, including ECs, Qualified Investigators (QIs), contract research organizations, and others, to ensure full compliance with the regulatory requirements.

Institutional EC Confirmation of Review and Approval
The CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps require the sponsor to obtain institutional EC approval for each participating site prior to initiating a clinical trial. (See Ethics Committee topic, Scope of Review subtopic for detailed information on the institutional EC review and approval process).

Qualified Investigators (QIs)
In accordance with the G-CanadaCTApps, prior to initiating a clinical trial, the sponsor must ensure that a QIU form (or similar documentation that meets the CanadaFDR requirements) has been completed and is kept on file by the sponsor. Per the CanadaFDR, the form certifies that the QI will conduct the clinical trial in accordance with good clinical practices and will immediately inform trial participants and the institutional EC of trial discontinuance and the reason for this discontinuance. If there is a change in the QI at a site, a new CTSI Form must be submitted to HC, and a new QIU form must be maintained by the sponsor.

Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB)
While not required, the CA-ICH-GCPs recommends establishing a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (known as an Independent Data-Monitoring Committee in Canada) to assess the progress of a clinical trial, including the safety data and the critical efficacy endpoints at intervals, and to recommend to the sponsor whether to continue, modify, or stop a trial.

Clinical Trials Registry
As per G-CanadaCTApps, sponsors should register their clinical trials on one (1) of two (2) publicly accessible registries accepting international clinical trial information and recognized by the World Health Organization: ClinicalTrials.gov and the Current Controlled Trials International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number Register. According to Additional Resource (F), clinical trial registration is not a mandatory requirement at this time.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Overview of the Clinical Trial Application Process (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (Website) Research Ethics Board Attestation (Last Updated December 18, 2013) (2003)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated December 18, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(D) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Frequently Asked Questions, Drug Importation (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(E) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 1.25

(F) (Notice) Notice – Update: Registration and Disclosure of Clinical Trial Information (October 19, 2012)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.006 and C.05.012)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2 and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (G-CanadaNon-eCTD) (February 3, 2016) (Effective Date: September 25, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1-3 and 3-3

(4) (Guidance) Guidance for Records Related to Clinical Trials” Guide 0068 - Interpretation of section C.05.012 of the Food and Drug Regulations - Division 5 “Drugs for clinical trials involving human subjects” (G-FDR-0068) (Issued May 23, 2006) (Effective date: June 15, 2006)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 6.0 and 8.0

Clinical Trial Lifecycle > Safety Reporting
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 08, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
According to the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, the following definitions provide a basis for a common understanding of Canada’s safety reporting requirements:

  • Adverse Event (AE) – Any adverse occurrence in the health of a clinical trial subject who is administered a drug that may or may not be caused by the administration of the drug, and includes an adverse drug reaction.
  • Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) – Any noxious and unintended response to a drug that is caused by the administration of any dose of the drug.
  • Serious Adverse Drug Reaction (SADR) or Serious Adverse Event (SAE) – Any untoward medical occurrence that at any dose: results in death, is life threatening, requires hospitalization or prolongation of existing hospitalization, results in persistent or significant disability or incapacity, or causes a congenital anomaly/birth defect.
  • Serious, Unexpected ADR: A serious ADR that is not identified in nature, severity or frequency in the risk information set out in the investigator’s brochure or on the label of the drug.

Reporting Requirements for AEs/ADRs
Sponsor Responsibilities
As delineated in the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resources (A), (B), and (C), the sponsor is required to expedite reports of ADRs to Health Canada (HC) that meet these three (3) criteria: serious, unexpected, and having a suspected causal relationship. ADR reports that are expected or unexpected, but not serious, should not be reported to HC, but rather monitored and tracked by the sponsor. Further detail and clarifications on AE/ADR reporting criteria can be found in Additional Resources (B) and (C).

Per the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, during a clinical trial, the sponsor is required to inform HC of any serious, unexpected ADR that has occurred inside or outside Canada. An ADR report must be filed in the following specified timelines:

  • When the ADR is neither fatal nor life-threatening, within 15 days after becoming aware of the information
  • When it is fatal or life-threatening, immediately when possible and, in any event, within seven (7) days after becoming aware of the information
  • Within eight (8) days after having informed HC of the ADR, submit a report that includes an assessment of the importance and implication of any findings

Qualified Investigator (QI) Responsibilities
As specified in the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resources (B) and (C), when evaluating whether an AE is serious and unexpected, the Qualified Investigator’s (QI) and sponsor’s determination of causality is important. Only serious and unexpected ADRs that they have found to have a reasonable suspected causal relationship to the drug should be reported by the sponsor to HC.

Form Completion and Delivery Requirements
As per the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resources (A), (B), and (C), all serious and unexpected ADRs should be reported individually to HC. According to Additional Resource (C), at a minimum, the report should include: an identifiable patient, the name of a suspect medicinal product, an identifiable reporting source, and an event or outcome that can be identified as serious and unexpected and for which, in clinical investigation cases, there is a reasonable suspected causal relationship. The G-CanadaCTApps requires the sponsor to complete the Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) for Clinical Trials, Expedited Reporting Summary Form and the CIOMS I Form and fax them to the appropriate HC Directorate: BGTD Fax: 613-957-0364; TPD Fax: 613-941-2121.

Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB)
The Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs) recommends establishing a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (known as an Independent Data-Monitoring Committee in Canada) to assess the progress of a clinical trial, including the safety data and the critical efficacy endpoints at intervals, and to recommend to the sponsor whether to continue, modify, or stop a trial.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Post-Authorization Requirements (Last Updated February 5, 2009)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (ICH Guidance) ICH Harmonised Tripartite Guideline, Clinical Safety Data Management: Definitions and Standards for Expedited Reporting E2A (October 27, 1994)
International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use

(C) (Notice) E2A: Clinical Safety Data Management: Definitions and Standards for Expedited Reporting – Reminder for Sponsors (August 21, 2012)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Attachment 1

(D) (Form) Suspect Adverse Reaction Report Form (CIOMS Form I) (Date Unavailable)
Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, Geneva, Switzerland

(E) (Form) Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) for Clinical Trials, Expedited Reporting Summary Form (Date Unavailable)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(F) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.25 and 5.5

REQUIREMENTS

1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001. and C.05.014)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.1 and 2.8

Clinical Trial Lifecycle > Progress Reporting
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 08, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
Pursuant to the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, Additional Resource (A), and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), investigators and sponsors share responsibility for submitting interim and annual reports on the status of a clinical trial. The investigator is required to provide annual progress reports to the institutional ethics committee (EC) and submit interim progress reports to the EC and Health Canada (HC) if there are any significant changes affecting the trial or risk to participants. The sponsor is required to submit annual reports (in the form of an updated Investigator’s Brochure (IB)) to HC.

Interim Progress Reports
As per the CA-ICH-GCPs, the investigator should promptly provide written reports to the sponsor and the institutional EC on any changes significantly affecting the conduct of the trial, and/or increasing the risk to participants.

According to the G-TCPS2, investigators must report new information that may affect the welfare or consent of participants to the institutional EC, HC, and other appropriate regulatory or advisory entities. New information may comprise a range of issues, including, but not limited to:

  • Changes to the research design
  • Evidence of any new risks
  • Unanticipated issues that have possible health or safety consequences for participants
  • New information that decisively proves the benefits of one intervention over another
  • New research findings, including relevant non-trial findings
  • Unanticipated problems
  • Closure of trials at other sites for reasons that may be relevant to the welfare or consent of participants in the ongoing trial

Annual Report
In accordance with the G-CanadaCTApps and Additional Resource (A), the sponsor must submit annually an updated IB, which serves as the annual report, including all safety information and global status, to Health Canada (HC). Revisions that are more frequent may be appropriate depending on the stage of development and the generation of relevant new information. As required in G-CanadaNon-eCTD, the annual updated IB should be submitted electronically as a CTA-Notification, and include a statement confirming that the protocol and/or informed consent form do not require changes as a result of the updated IB. In all cases, the updated IB should be accompanied by a list of changes that clearly describe the sections that have changed, including a rationale for each change.

Pursuant to the CA-ICH-GCPs, the investigator should submit written summaries of the trial status to the institutional EC annually, or more frequently, if requested.

Final Report
Upon completion of the trial, as delineated in CA-ICH-GCPs, the investigator is required to submit a final report to the institutional EC summarizing the trial’s outcome.

According to Additional Resource (C), HC encourages sponsors to submit a notification to HC indicating that the trial is complete. However, HC does not require the sponsor to provide supporting information with this notification and the CanadaFDR does not require submission of a final study report.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Post-Authorization Requirements (Last Updated February 5, 2009)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.10 and 4.13

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – FAQs, Completion of Clinical Trials (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.012 and C.05.013)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.8

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (G-CanadaNon-eCTD) (February 3, 2016) (Effective Date: September 25, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1-3 and 3-3

(4) (3) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Article 11.8

Sponsorship > Definition of Sponsor
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As per the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, a sponsor is defined as an individual, corporate body, institution, or organization that conducts a clinical trial.

In accordance with the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), Canada also permits a sponsor to transfer any or all of its trial-related duties and functions to a contract research organization (CRO) and/or institutional site(s). However, the ultimate responsibility for the trial data’s quality and integrity always resides with the sponsor. Any trial-related responsibilities to be transferred to a CRO should be specified in a written agreement. The CRO should implement quality assurance and quality control.

According to the CanadaFDR and G-CanadaCTApps, a sponsor may be domestic or foreign. A foreign sponsor is required to have a senior medical or scientific officer who is residing in Canada who will represent the sponsor, and sign and date the application and the clinical trial attestation form.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 5

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.005, C.05.015)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 2.1

Sponsorship > Trial Authorization
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (A), the sponsor submits a clinical trial application (CTA) or amendment to a previously approved clinical trial application (CTA-A) to Health Canada (HC) to obtain authorization to conduct a clinical trial, or pursue the clinical trial amendment. In addition, as delineated in the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, the sponsor may submit a CTA for clinical trial authorization to HC in parallel with his/her submission to an institutional ethics committee (EC) (known as Research Ethics Board (REB) in Canada) for a favorable ethical opinion. However, per the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and Additional Resource (B), HC will not authorize the sponsor to begin the clinical trial until he/she submits an institutional EC approval (provided in the required Clinical Trial Site Information form) for each participating trial site. (See the Ethics Committee topic, Ethics Committee subtopic for detailed coverage of EC structure.)

As delineated in the G-CanadaNon-eCTD and Additional Resource (C), to complete the CTA, the sponsor must submit a clinical trial application electronically pursuant to the guidance in the G-CanadaNon-eCTD and the G-CanadaCTApps.

The CTA package includes, but is not limited to:

  • Protocol
  • Summary of potential risks/benefits
  • Clinical trial attestation (including contact information for the institutional EC that approved the protocol, if EC approval is known at the time of submitting the application)
  • Contact information of any institutional EC that previously refused to approve the protocol, its reason(s), and refusal date
  • Investigator’s Brochure
  • Informed consent form
  • Information about use of a human-sourced excipient
  • Chemistry and manufacturing information
  • Proposed date for trial commencement at each site, if known

For more details on what is required in the CTA, see the G-CanadaNon-eCTD and the G-CanadaCTApps. See the Clinical Trial Lifecycle topic, Submission Content subtopic for detailed submission requirements.

According to the G-CanadaCTApps, if HC authorizes the CTA, then it issues a No Objection Letter (NOL). If HC rejects the CTA, it sends a Not Satisfactory Notice (NSN). HC will issue a NSN if it identifies significant deficiencies, or, if a timely response to information requested has not been provided. The sponsor may resubmit the information and material at a future time, and it will be processed as a new CTA.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Drugs and Health Products - Background (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Food and Drugs Act and Regulations

(B) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Clinical Trial Site Information form

(C) (Notice) Drugs and Health Products - Notice: Preparation of Clinical Trial Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (March 2, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.005, C.05.006, C.05.008)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.3, 2.4, 2.5 and 2.7

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (G-CanadaNon-eCTD) (February 3, 2016) (Effective Date: September 25, 2015)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2, 3.1

Sponsorship > Insurance
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
The CanadaFDR does not require the sponsor to provide insurance coverage to investigators, institutions, or trial participants. However, G-CanadaRecords and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs) guide sponsors on providing insurance.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 5.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

(2) (Guidance) Guidance for Records Related to Clinical Trials (G-CanadaRecords) (May 23, 2006) (Effective date: June 15, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 8.2

Sponsorship > Compensation
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
The Canadian regulations do not require compensation for trial participants in the event of trial-related injuries or death. However, G-CanadaRecords and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), provide guidance for sponsors on providing compensation to research participants in the event of trial-related injuries or death. The sponsor must explain to participants the compensation and/or treatment available to them in the event of trial-related injuries. (See Informed Consent topic, Compensation Disclosure subtopic for more information on participant compensation rights).

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 4.8 and 5.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Guidance for Records Related to Clinical Trials (G-CanadaRecords) (May 23, 2006) (Effective date: June 15, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 8.2

Sponsorship > Quality, Data & Records Management
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As stated in the CanadaFDR and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), the sponsor is responsible for implementing and maintaining quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) systems with written standard operating procedures (SOPs) to ensure that trials are conducted and data generated, recorded, and reported in compliance with the protocol, the CA-ICH-GCPs, and the applicable regulatory requirements. The sponsor is responsible for obtaining agreement from all involved parties to ensure direct access to all trial related sites, source data/documents, reports for monitoring and auditing purposes, and inspection by domestic and foreign regulatory authorities. QC should be applied to each stage of data handling to ensure that all data are reliable and have been correctly processed. A written agreement must be signed by both the sponsor and the investigator or any other parties involved with the clinical trial, verifying that both parties agree to the trial protocol, the monitoring and auditing practices, the SOPs, and their respective duties.

Electronic Data Processing System
When using electronic trial data handling processing systems, the sponsor must ensure and document that the electronic data processing system conforms to the sponsor’s established requirements for completeness, accuracy, reliability, and consistency of intended performance, and that he/she maintains SOPs for using these systems. Refer to the CA-ICH GCPs for additional information.

Record Management
As set forth in the CanadaFDR, the CanadaFDR1024, and the G-CanadaRecords, the sponsor must record, handle, and store all trial-related information to allow complete and accurate reporting, interpretation, and verification. The sponsor should maintain all trial-related records for a period of 25 years. Pursuant to CanadaFDR1024, the sponsor must submit requested records to Health Canada (HC) within 48 hours if safety concerns arise. Additionally, to facilitate inspection of a site, the sponsor must submit information to HC within seven (7) days of a request.

Audit Requirements
As part of its QA system, the CA-ICH GCPs notes that the sponsor should ensure the trial is monitored and audited. The purpose of the audit should be to evaluate trial conduct and compliance with the protocol, SOPs, CA-ICH-GCPs, and other applicable regulatory requirements. The sponsor should appoint auditors to review the clinical trial. The sponsor should ensure that the auditors are qualified by training and experience, and auditor’s qualifications should be documented. The sponsor must also ensure that the audit is conducted in accordance with his/her own SOPs and the auditor observations are documented.

Premature Study Termination/Suspension
The CanadaFDR states that if a trial is prematurely terminated or suspended, the sponsor should inform HC no later than 15 days after the termination or suspension. In addition, the sponsor should provide HC with the reason(s) for the termination or suspension and its impact on the proposed or ongoing clinical trials related to the drug in Canada by the sponsor. The sponsor should also promptly notify the qualified investigators of the termination or suspension and advise them in writing of any potential risks to the participants’ health. According to the CA-ICH GCPs, the ethics committee (EC) should also be informed promptly and provided the reason(s) for the termination or suspension by the sponsor.

Multicenter Studies
As delineated in the CA-ICH GCPs, in the event of a multicenter trial, the sponsor must ensure that:

  • All investigators conduct the trial in strict compliance with the protocol agreed to by the sponsor, and, if required, by HC
  • The EC has given approval to the protocol
  • The case report forms (CRFs) are designed to capture the required data at all multicenter trial sites
  • The responsibilities of coordinating investigator(s) and the other participating investigators are documented prior to the start of the trial
  • All investigators are given instructions on following the protocol, on complying with a uniform set of standards to assess clinical and laboratory findings, and on completing the CRFs
  • Communication between investigators is facilitated

The CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and the G-CanadaNon-eCTD, require the sponsor to complete and retain the Research Ethics Board (REB) Attestation and Qualified Investigator Undertaking forms at each trial site, while submitting in electronic format the Clinical Trial Site Information form to the appropriate HC Directorate for each trial site.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 5.1, 5.5, 5.19, 5.21, and 5.23

(B) (Website) Research Ethics Board Attestation (Last Updated April 8, 2016)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections:  REB Attestation and Qualified Investigator Undertaking forms

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.010, C.05.012, and C.05.015)

(2) (Regulation) Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1024 — Clinical Trials) (CanadaFDR1024 – English and French) (June 17, 2001)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.2 and 2.7

(4) (Guidance) Guidance Document: Preparation of Drug Regulatory Activities in the "Non-eCTD Electronic-Only" Format (G-CanadaNon-eCTD) (Effective Date: September 25, 2015) (February 3, 2016)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1-3 and 3-3

(5) (Guidance) Guidance for Records Related to Clinical Trials (G-CanadaRecords) (May 23, 2006) (Effective date: June 15, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 6.0

Sponsorship > Site/Investigator Selection
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As set forth in the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs), the sponsor should select the investigator(s) and the institution(s) for the clinical trial, taking into account the appropriateness and availability of the study site and facilities. The sponsor must also ensure that the investigator(s) are qualified by training and experience. If a multicenter trial will be conducted, the sponsor must organize a coordinating committee or select coordinating investigators. Prior to entering into an agreement with the investigator(s) to conduct a trial, the sponsor should provide the investigator(s) with the protocol and an investigator’s brochure. Furthermore, the sponsor must sign an agreement or contract with the participating institution(s).

In accordance with the G-CanadaCTApps, prior to initiating a clinical trial, the sponsor must ensure that a Qualified Investigator Undertaking (QIU) form (or similar documentation that meets the CanadaFDR requirements) has been completed and kept on file by the sponsor. Per the CanadaFDR, the form certifies that the qualified investigator will conduct the clinical trial in accordance with good clinical practices, and will immediately inform trial participants and the institutional ethics committee (EC) of trial discontinuance, and the reason for this discontinuance. (See the Clinical Trial Lifecycle topic, Submission Content subtopic for additional information on clinical trial application requirements).

Data Safety and Monitoring Board
Although not specified as a sponsor requirement, the CA-ICH-GCPs states that a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (known as an Independent Data-Monitoring Committee in Canada) may be established to assess the progress of a clinical trial, including the safety data and the critical efficacy endpoints at intervals, and to recommend to the sponsor whether to continue, modify, or stop a trial.

Foreign Sponsor Responsibilities
According to the CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps, a sponsor may be domestic or foreign. A foreign sponsor is required to have a senior medical or scientific officer who is residing in Canada represent the sponsor, and sign and date the application and the clinical trial attestation form.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.25, 5.5, and 5.6

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.005)

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 2.1, 2.7.2

Informed Consent > Documentation Requirements
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In all Canadian clinical trials, a freely given informed consent is required from each participant in accordance with the requirements set forth in the CanadaFDR, the G-TCPS2, and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH-GCPs).

As per the CanadaFDR, the G-TCPS2, and the CA-ICH GCPs, the informed consent form (ICF) is viewed as an essential document that must be reviewed and approved by an institutional ethics committee (EC) (known as a Research Ethics Board in Canada) and provided to Health Canada (HC) with the clinical trial application (CTA). (See the Informed Consent topic, Required Elements subtopic for details on what should be included in the form.)

The G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs state that the qualified investigator must provide detailed research study information to the participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s). As delineated in the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, the ICF content should be in plain language (i.e., non-technical and easy to understand) and provided in a format that facilitates understanding. For example, written documentation may be supplemented with audio and/or visual aids. The participant and his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) should also be given adequate time to consider whether to participate.

Re-Consent
According to the CA-ICH GCPs, any change in the ICF that is relevant to the participant’s consent should be approved by the institutional EC prior to implementing any changes. The participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) should also be informed in a timely manner if new information becomes available that may be relevant to the participant’s willingness to continue participation in the trial. The communication of this information should be documented.

Language Requirements
The sponsor can submit the CTA and supporting materials, including the ICF, in either official language—English or French. The G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs require the ICF to be presented in plain language that the participant is able to understand. If there is a language barrier, the G-TCPS2 indicates that the qualified investigator should select an intermediary who has the necessary language skills to ensure effective communication.

Documentation Copies
As per the CA-ICH GCPs, the participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s), as well as the qualified investigator, must sign and date the ICF. The CA-ICH GCPs and the G-FDR-0068 state that the signed ICF should be retained by the qualified investigator.

According to the CA-ICH GCPs, where the participant is illiterate and/or his/her legal representative(s) and/or guardian(s) is illiterate, an impartial witness should be present during the entire informed consent discussion. The witness should sign and date the ICF after the following steps have occurred:

  • The written ICF and any other written information to be provided to the participant is read and explained to the participant and his/her legal representative(s) and/or guardian(s)
  • The participant and his/her legal representative(s) and/or guardian(s), have orally consented to the participant’s involvement in the trial, and has signed and dated the ICF, if capable of doing so

Before participating in the study, the participant or his/her legal representative(s) and/or guardian(s) should receive a copy of the signed and dated ICF.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 4.8, 8.2, and 8.3

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.005, C.05.006, C.05.008, and C.05.010))

(2) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 3

(3) (Guidance) Guidance for Records Related to Clinical Trials” Guide 0068 - Interpretation of section C.05.012 of the Food and Drug Regulations - Division 5 “Drugs for clinical trials involving human subjects” (G-FDR-0068) (May 23, 2006) (Effective date: June 15, 2006)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Annex 1 (8)

Informed Consent > Required Elements
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As delineated in the CanadaFDR, the G-TCPS2, and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), prior to beginning a clinical trial, the investigator is required to obtain ethics committee (EC) (known as Research Ethics Board in Canada) approval for the written informed consent form (ICF) and any other information being provided to the research participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s).

The G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs state that information about the research study should be presented in easily understandable language in a format that facilitates understanding. For example, written documentation may be supplemented with audio and/or visual aids. The participant and his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) should also be given adequate time to consider whether to participate.

No Coercion
As per the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, none of the oral and written information concerning the research study, including the written ICF, should contain any language that causes the participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) and/or guardian(s) to waive or to appear to waive his/her legal rights, or that releases or appears to release the investigator(s), the institution, the sponsor, or their representative(s) from their liabilities for any negligence.

ICF Required Elements
Based on  the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, the ICF should include the following statements or descriptions, as applicable:

  • The study involves research and an explanation of its purpose and duration
  • The trial treatment(s) and the probability for random assignment to each treatment
  • The procedures to be followed, including all invasive procedures
  • The participant’s responsibilities
  • Those aspects of the trial that are experimental
  • Any reasonably foreseeable risks or inconveniences to the participant and, when applicable, to an embryo, fetus, or nursing infant
  • Any reasonably expected benefits; if no benefit is expected, the participant should be made aware of this
  • The disclosure of specific alternative procedure(s) or therapies available to the participant, and their important potential benefits and risks
  • Compensation and/or treatment available to the participant in the event of a trial-related injury
  • The anticipated prorated payment, if any, to the participant for participating in the trial
  • Any expenses the participant needs to pay to participate in the trial
  • That participation is voluntary, and that the participant can refuse to participate or withdraw from the trial, at any time, without penalty or loss of benefits to which the participant is otherwise entitled
  • Confidentiality of records identifying the participant will be maintained, and permission given to monitors, the auditors, the ethics committee, and Health Canada (HC) to access the participant’s medical records to verify the procedures and/or data, without violating the confidentiality of the participant, insofar as the applicable laws and regulations permit, and that, by signing a written ICF, the participant or the participant’s legal representative(s) or guardian(s) is authorizing such access
  • That records identifying the participant will not be made publicly available, insofar as the applicable laws and/or regulations permit; if the results of the trial are published, the participant’s identity will remain confidential
  • The participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) will be notified in a timely manner if information becomes available that may affect the participant’s willingness to continue
  • The qualified investigator’s contact information for further information regarding the trial and the rights of participants, and whom to contact in the event of a trial-related injury
  • Foreseeable circumstances and/or reasons under which the participant’s involvement in the trial may be terminated
  • The approximate number of participants in the trial

See the Informed Consent topic, Compensation Disclosure and Vulnerable Populations subtopics and the Specimens topic, Consent for Specimens subtopic for further information.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.005))

(2) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 3

Informed Consent > Compensation Disclosure
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the G-TCPS2 and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), the informed consent form (ICF) should contain a statement describing the compensation or medical treatment a participant can receive for participating in a clinical trial.

Compensation for Participation in Research
As per the G-TCPS2 and CA-ICH GCPs, the ICF should contain a statement with a description of the anticipated prorated payment to the participant(s) that is reasonably expected for participation in the trial. Any compensation or incentive to participants must not be so excessive that it may unfairly influence participants, or cause them to overlook important facts and risks.

Compensation for Injury
As per the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, the ICF should include a statement advising the participant about whether compensation and medical treatment is available in the event of any trial-related injury. (See the Informed Consent topic, Required Elements subtopic for additional details on what should be included in the ICF.)
 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3.1, 3.2, and 4.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 3

Informed Consent > Participant Rights
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDR, the G-TCPS2, and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), Canada’s ethical standards promote respect for all human beings and safeguard the rights of research participants. The G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs state that a participant’s rights must also be clearly addressed in the informed consent form (ICF) and during the informed consent process.

The Right to Participate, Abstain, or Withdraw
As stated in the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, the participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) should be informed that participation is voluntary, that he/she may withdraw from the research study at any time, and that refusal to participate will not involve any penalty or loss of benefits to which the participant is otherwise entitled.

The Right to Information
As per the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, a potential research participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) has the right to be informed about the nature and purpose of the research study, its anticipated duration, study procedures, any potential benefits or risks, any compensation or treatment in the case of injury, and any significant new information regarding the research study.

The Right to Privacy and Confidentiality
According to the G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs, all participants must be afforded the right to privacy and confidentiality, and the ICF must provide a statement that recognizes this right.

The Right of Inquiry/Appeal
The G-TCPS2 and the CA-ICH GCPs state that the research participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) should be provided with contact information for the individual responsible for addressing trial-related inquiries and/or his/her rights.

The Right to Safety and Welfare
The CA-ICH GCPs, which upholds the Declaration of Helsinki, clearly state that a research participant’s right to safety and the protection of his/her health and welfare must take precedence over the interests of science and society.

See the Informed Consent topic, and the subtopics of Required Elements and Vulnerable Populations for additional information regarding requirements for participant rights.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.27, 3.1 and 4.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001 and C.05.005))

(2) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.1, 2, 3.1, and 3.2

Informed Consent > Special Circumstances/Emergencies
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
The G-TCPS2 and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) make provisions to protect the rights of a research participant during the informed consent process when the procedure is complicated by special circumstances. Special circumstances can be medical emergencies or when a participant is mentally incapacitated.

Medical Emergencies
As per the CA-ICH GCPs, in an emergency, if the signed informed consent form (ICF) has not been obtained from the research participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s), or, if an effective treatment is lacking but the investigational product could address the participant’s emergency needs, the clinical trial may be conducted. However, the method used on the participant must be explained clearly in the trial protocol, and the ethics committee (EC) (known as Research Ethics Board in Canada) must approve the protocol in advance. The participant and/or his/her legal representative(s) or guardian(s) should be informed about the trial as soon as possible, and consent to continue and other consent should be requested, as appropriate.

Alteration of Consent
The G-TCPS2 specifies that although voluntary informed consent is always a requirement for every trial, the EC may approve an alteration of consent if the study satisfies all of the following conditions:

  • It involves only minimal risk to participants
  • The alternation is unlikely to adversely affect the participants’ welfare
  • It is impossible or impracticable to conduct the research properly, given the research design, if the prior consent of participants is required
  • The nature and extent of any proposed alteration is defined
  • A plan to debrief participants, if possible, which may also offer participants the opportunity to refuse consent and/or withdraw data and/or human biological materials

Re-Consent
Per the G-TCPS2, re-consent is applicable in cases in which a participant regains consciousness from an unconscious state and/or recovers his/her mental capacity to understand the research study. If such an event is expected, then procedures to address this circumstance should be clearly explained in the ICF.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3.7 and 3.8

Informed Consent > Vulnerable Populations
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As per the G-TCPS2, in all Canadian clinical trials, research participants selected from vulnerable populations must be provided additional protections to safeguard their health and welfare during the informed consent process. The Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) characterizes vulnerable populations as those who may be unduly influenced by the expectation, whether justified or not, of benefits associated with participation, or of a retaliatory response from not participating. Examples are members of a group with a hierarchical structure, such as medical, pharmacy, dental, and nursing students, subordinate hospital and laboratory personnel, employees of the pharmaceutical industry, members of the armed forces, and persons kept in detention. Other vulnerable subjects include patients with incurable diseases, persons in nursing homes, unemployed or impoverished persons, patients in emergency situations, ethnic minority groups, homeless persons, nomads, refugees, minors, and those incapable of giving consent.

The CA-ICH GCPs specify that ethics committees (ECs) (known as Research Ethics Boards in Canada) must pay special attention to protecting participants who are from vulnerable populations.

See the Informed Consent topic, and the subtopics of Children/Minors; Pregnant Women, Fetuses & Neonates; and Mentally Impaired for additional information about these vulnerable populations.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.61, 3.1, and 4.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3.9 and 4.7

Informed Consent > Children/Minors
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
According to Additional Resource (A), a minor is someone under 18 or 19 years of age, depending on the Canadian province or territory. See Additional Resource (A) for a detailed breakdown of the legal age of majority in each province or territory.

As per the G-TCPS2 and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), when the research participant is a child, the informed consent form (ICF) must be signed by the child’s legal representative(s) and/or guardian(s). All pediatric participants, however, should be informed to the extent compatible with the child’s understanding, and if capable, the pediatric participant should sign and personally date the ICF.

As stated in G-TCPS2, children should only participate in clinical studies when the research objective cannot be achieved with adult participants only. When considering the inclusion of children in research, the investigators and ethics committees (ECs) (known as Research Ethics Boards in Canada) must consider a child’s stage of physical, physiological, psychological, and social development to ensure adequate protections for his/her welfare.

Assent
According to Additional Resource (C), which offers best practices and guidance to researchers and ECs in pediatric research and complements the G-TCPS2, provincial laws in Canada vary as to when a child is presumed to be legally competent to provide informed consent. Some provinces use age while others use a competence-based evaluation.

As per Additional Resource (C), if the pediatric participant has the capacity for assent, his/her affirmative assent is required to participate in a study according to his/her level of development and capacities. When the child develops the legal capacity to provide informed consent or attains the legal age of majority (which depends on the province), researchers should obtain an informed consent. Regarding dissent, Additional Resource (C) states that the researchers must respect the dissent of a child who is capable of understanding.

For more detail and guidance about best practices for research involving pediatric participants, see Additional Resource (C).

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Requirements for Informed Consent Documents (August 15, 2014)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Age of Majority by Province or Territory

(B) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.8

(C) (Report) Best Practices for Health Research Involving Children and Adolescents: Genetic, Pharmaceutical and Longitudinal Studies (2012)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Government of Canada; Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University; and Maternal Infant Child and Youth Research Network

Relevant Sections: Guidelines III and IV

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.4

Informed Consent > Pregnant Women, Fetuses & Neonates
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As per the G-TCPS2, studies involving women of childbearing age or who are pregnant require additional safeguards to ensure that the research assesses the risks to the women and the fetuses.

In accordance with the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), informed consent requirements for conducting clinical trials with pregnant or nursing women or fetuses follow the general requirements listed in the Informed Consent topic, Required Elements subtopic. Specifically, the informed consent form should include a statement on the reasonably foreseeable risks or inconveniences to the participant, and when applicable, to an embryo, fetus, or nursing infant.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.8

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (Revised December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 4.3

Informed Consent > Prisoners
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
According to the G-TCPS2 and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), prisoners are considered vulnerable because incarceration could affect their ability to make a voluntary decision regarding participation in research. A research study involving prisoners should ensure that these prospective participants are informed, and are given the opportunity to make their own decisions without any interference from a higher authority.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 1.61

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3.1 and 4.7

Informed Consent > Mentally Impaired
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
According to the G-TCPS2 and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), the ethics committee (known as Research Ethics Board in Canada) must approve the participation of research participants who are mentally or physically incapable of giving consent. As delineated in the G-TCPS2, the participant’s legal representative(s) or guardian(s) must consent on behalf of the mentally impaired participant. If mentally impaired participants are capable of verbally or physically assenting to, or dissenting from participation, the investigator must ascertain the wishes of that individual. Dissent will preclude participation of a mentally impaired person.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 1.61 and 3.1

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3.10

Investigational Products > Definition of Investigational Product
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview

As delineated in the CanadaFDR and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), an investigational product is defined as a pharmaceutical form of an active ingredient or placebo being tested or used as a reference in a clinical trial, including a product with a marketing authorization when used or assembled (formulated or packaged) in a way different from the approved form.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 1.33

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001))

Investigational Products > Manufacturing & Import
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
As specified in the CanadaFDR and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), Health Canada (HC) authorizes the manufacture of investigational products (IPs) in Canada. HC approves the manufacture of IPs as part of the clinical trial application (CTA) approval. The G-QCM-PharmCTAs provides guidance and templates to assist sponsors in completing the quality portion of the CTA which, in turn, enables HC to adequately assess investigational product (IP) characteristics.

HC also authorizes the import of IPs. The G-CanadaCTApps, the G-HlthProdImprtReqs, and Additional Resource (B) state that if a sponsor wants to import a drug into Canada for a clinical trial, he/she must include a copy of HC’s authorization (i.e., the No Objection Letter) issued by either the Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD) or the Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD) for the applicable trial with the shipment. A copy of this authorization must be provided at the port of entry.

If a sponsor plans to send the clinical trial IP(s) directly to each trial site, then the sponsor must also authorize the importer (i.e., the clinical trial site) when submitting the CTA using Appendix I of HC’s Drug Submission Application Form (HC/SC 3011) (Additional Resource (C)). In addition, the G-CanadaCTApps requires the sponsor to ensure systems and procedures are in place for monitoring, storage conditions, transportation, and disposition of the imported drug. The sponsor ultimately bears responsibility for the correct handling and storage of the IP used in the clinical trial.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 2.12

(B) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Frequently Asked Questions (Last Updated July 11, 2006)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Drug Importation

(C) (Website) Drugs and Health Products – Forms (Last Updated August 8, 2016)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.005))

(3) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (Revised March 17, 2016) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 2.7

(4) (Guidance) Guidance Document on the Import Requirements for Health Products under the Food and Drugs Act and its Regulations (GUI-0084) (G-HlthProdImprtReqs) (Effective Date: June 1, 2010)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 6.0 (Figure 1)

(5) (Guidance) Guidance Document – Quality (Chemistry and Manufacturing) Guidance: Clinical Trial Applications (CTAs) for Pharmaceuticals (G-QCM-PharmCTAs) (Effective Date: June 1, 2009)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: I, S – Drug Substance, and P – Drug Product

Investigational Products > IMP/IND Quality Requirements
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDR and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), the sponsor is responsible for providing the investigators with an Investigator’s Brochure (IB). The CanadaFDR and the CA-ICH GCPs specify that the IB must contain all of the relevant information on the investigational product(s) (IPs), including significant physical, chemical, pharmaceutical, pharmacological, toxicological, pharmacokinetic, metabolic, and clinical information. The sponsor must ensure that an up-to-date IB is made available to the investigator(s), and the investigator(s) must provide an up-to-date IB to the ethics committee.

IB Content Requirements
The CanadaFDR and the CA-ICH GCPs require the IB to provide coverage of the following areas:

  • Physical, chemical, and pharmaceutical properties and formulation parameters
  • Non-clinical studies (pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and metabolism profiles)
  • Effects of IP in humans (pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacodynamics; safety and efficacy; and regulatory and post-marketing experiences)
  • Summary of data and guidance for the investigator(s)

See Section 7 of the CA-ICH GCPs for detailed content guidelines.

The sponsor is also accountable for supplying the IP, which includes ensuring that the IP is supplied by another designated or contracted party, including the comparator(s) and placebo, if applicable. As specified in the CA-ICH GCPs, the sponsor must ensure that the products are manufactured in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs).

Certificate of Analysis
Pursuant to the CA-ICH GCPs, the sponsor must maintain a Certificate of Analysis to document the identity, purity, and strength of the IP(s) to be used in the clinical trial.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 5.13, 7.3, and 8.2

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.005, and C.05.012))

Investigational Products > Labeling & Packaging
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
Investigational product (IP) labeling in Canada must comply with the requirements set forth in the CanadaFDR, the G-CanadaCTApps, and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs). The CanadaFDR and the G-CanadaCTApps state that for an IP to be used in a clinical trial, it must be properly labeled in both official languages: English and French. The following information must be included on the IP label:

  • A statement indicating that the drug is an investigational drug to be used only by a qualified investigator
  • Name, number, or identifying mark
  • Expiration date
  • Recommended storage conditions
  • Lot number
  • Sponsor’s name and address
  • Protocol code or identification
  • Radiopharmaceutical information, if applicable

In addition, the CA-ICH GCPs state that the IP must be coded and labeled in a manner that protects the blinding, if applicable. The IPs must also be suitably packaged in a manner that will prevent contamination and unacceptable deterioration during transport and storage.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 5.13

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CRC, c. 870) (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.011))

(2) (Guidance) Guidance Document for Clinical Trial Sponsors: Clinical Trial Applications (G-CanadaCTApps) (Effective Date: May 29, 2013) (Revised March 17, 2016)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 2.8.7

Investigational Products > Product Management
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the CanadaFDR and the Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs), the sponsor is responsible for providing the investigators with an Investigator’s Brochure (IB). The CanadaFDR and the CA-ICH GCPs specify that the IB must contain all of the relevant information on investigational product(s) (IPs), including significant physical, chemical, pharmaceutical, pharmacological, toxicological, pharmacokinetic, metabolic, and clinical information. The sponsor must ensure that an up-to-date IB is made available to the investigator(s), and the investigator(s) must provide an up-to-date IB to the institutional ethics committee (EC).

Investigational Product Supply, Storage, and Handling Requirements
As defined in the CA-ICH GCPs, the sponsor must supply the investigator(s) with the IP(s), including the comparator and placebo, if applicable. The sponsor should not supply either party with the IP(s) until he/she obtains approvals from Health Canada (HC) and the institutional EC. The CA-ICH GCPs specify that the sponsor must ensure the following:

  • Timely delivery of the IP(s)
  • Records maintained for IP document shipment, receipt, disposition, return, and destruction
  • Written procedures including instructions for IP handling and storage, adequate and safe receipt of the IP(s), dispensing of the IP(s), retrieval of unused IP(s), return of unused IP(s) to the sponsor, and disposal of unused IP(s) by the sponsor
  • IP product quality and stability over the period of use
  • IP manufactured according to any application of the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs)
  • Proper coding packaging, and labeling of the IP(s)
  • Acceptable IP handling and storage conditions and shelf-life

Refer to the CA-ICH GCPs for detailed sponsor-related IP requirements.

Record Requirements
As set forth in the CanadaFDR, the CanadaFDR1024, and Additional Resource (B), the sponsor must record, handle, and store all trial-related information to allow complete and accurate reporting, interpretation, and verification. The sponsor should maintain all trial-related records for a period of 25 years. Pursuant to CanadaFDR1024, the sponsor must submit requested records to HC within 48 hours if safety concerns arise. Additionally, to facilitate inspection of a site, the sponsor must submit information to HC within seven (7) days of a request.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (CA ICH Guidance) Guidance for Industry: ICH Guidance E6 – Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline (CA-ICH GCPs) (Last Updated February 2, 2004) (1997)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 5.5, 5.12, 5.13, 5.14, and 7

(B) (Guidance) Guidance for Records Related to Clinical Trials (May 23, 2006) (Effective date: June 15, 2006)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 6.0

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Regulation) Food and Drug Regulations, (CanadaFDR – English and French) (Amended June 14, 2016)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Part C (Division 5 (C.05.001, C.05.005, and C.05.012)

(2) (Regulation) Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1024 — Clinical Trials) (CanadaFDR1024 – English and French) (June 17, 2001)
Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement

Specimens > Definition of Specimen
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In Canada, a specimen is referred to as “human biological material” or “biological material.” According to the G-TCPS2, human biological materials include tissues, organs, blood, plasma, skin, serum, DNA, RNA, proteins, cells, hair, nail clippings, urine, saliva, and other body fluids. The term also comprises materials related to human reproduction, including embryos, fetuses, fetal tissues, and human reproductive materials. The G-TCPS2 breaks down human biological material further into the following categories: anonymized, anonymous, coded, and identified human biological materials. Refer to the G-TCPS2 for more detailed information on these categories.

In addition, Additional Resource (A) defines biological material as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, proteins, and nucleic acids, as well as any biological matter that may contain microorganisms, proteins, nucleic acids, or parts thereof. Examples include, but are not limited to, bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, toxins, genetically modified organisms, nucleic acids, tissue samples, diagnostic specimens, live vaccines, and isolates of a pathogen (e.g., pure culture, suspension, purified spores).

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Document) Canadian Biosafety Standard (CBS) (Second Edition) (March 11, 2015)
Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Glossary

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Chapter 12 and Glossary

Specimens > Import & Export
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
According to the G-HlthProdImprtReqs, Health Canada does not have jurisdiction over human biological materials to be imported for testing or research purposes. The G-HlthProdImprtReqs further states that all blood samples as well as cultures, diagnostic specimens or research tissue are considered to be potential carriers of human or animal pathogens, and are regulated by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Per Additional Resources (A), (B), and (C), the PHAC’s Centre for Biosecurity oversees the licensing process under the authority of the HPTA and the HPTR. The HPTA states that a license must be issued by the Minister that authorizes the import or export of human pathogens or toxins.

Because all human biological materials are potential carriers of human pathogens, the PHAC has categorized these materials by risk group based on risk to the individual/animal and risk to the community. Risk Group 1 consists of microorganisms, nucleic acids or proteins that are unable or unlikely to cause human or animal disease so they are generally not considered to be pathogens, and are therefore exempt from the HPTA and the HPTR licensing requirements. Risk groups 2 through 4 are considered to be pathogens or toxins with moderate to high individual risk and low to high community risk, and are subject to the HPTA and the HPTR licensing requirements.

As specified in the HPTA, the HPTR, and Additional Resource (B), individuals planning to conduct controlled activities (including producing, possessing, handling, using, storing, providing access to, transferring, disposing of, releasing, abandoning, or importing/exporting) with a human pathogen or toxin, whether imported or domestically acquired, must obtain a license. See Additional Resources (B), (C), and (D) for detailed information and instructions on how to obtain a license for activities associated with Risk Groups 2 through 4. Additional Resource (D) provides further information on working with Risk Group 1.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Website) Public Health Agency of Canada – Licensing Program (Current as of June 21, 2016)
Public Health Agency of Canada, Government of Canada

(B) (Standard) Canadian Biosafety Standard (CBS) (Second Edition) (March 11, 2015)
Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Chapters 1 and 2

(C) (Guidance) Canadian Biosafety Handbook (Second Edition) (May 26, 2016)

Relevant Section: Chapter 21

(D) (Website) Public Health Agency of Canada – Laboratory Biosafety and Biosecurity (Current as of May 30, 2016)
Public Health Agency of Canada, Government of Canada

(E) (Article) Regulatory Oversight of Human Pathogens and Toxins in Canada, Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR) (Volume 41S-6) (December 17, 2015)
Labrie, C and Lecordier S
Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR), Public Health Agency of Canada, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Guidance Document on the Import Requirements for Health Products under the Food and Drugs Act and its Regulations (GUI-0084) (G-HlthProdImprtReqs) (June 1, 2010)
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: 10.0

(2) (Legislation) Human Pathogens and Toxins Act (S.C. 2009, c. 24) (HPTA) (December 1, 2015)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: Purpose of the Act, Interpretation and Application, Obligation, Prohibitions, and Licenses

(3) (Regulation) Human Pathogens and Toxins Regulations (SOR/2015-44) (HPTR) (December 1, 2015)
Parliament of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Section: Licenses

Specimens > Consent for Specimens
Back to Top
Email section Share    Print section Print
Last content review/update: September 02, 2016. Submit updates or comments.
SUMMARY

Overview
In accordance with the G-TCPS2, prior to collecting, storing, or using a research participant’s biological specimen(s), consent must be obtained from the participant and/or his/her legal representative(s).

Per the G-TCPS2, prior to the collection of research participant biological materials, the investigator(s) must obtain institutional ethics committee (EC) (known as Research Ethics Board (REB) in Canada) review and approval, and consent from the following:

  • the participant who will be donating biological materials, or, an authorized third party on behalf of a participant who lacks capacity, taking into account any research directive that applies to the participant, or,
  • a deceased participant through a donation decision made prior to death, or, by an authorized third party

In addition, the G-TCPS2 states that in order to seek participant consent to use his/her biological materials in research, the investigator (s) must provide prospective participants or authorized third parties with the following information:

  • The type and amount of biological materials to be taken
  • The manner in which biological materials will be taken, and the safety and invasiveness of the procedures
  • The intended uses of the biological materials, including any commercial use
  • The measures employed to protect the privacy of and minimize risks to participants
  • The length of time the biological materials will be kept, how they will be preserved, location of storage (e.g., in Canada or outside Canada), and process for disposal, if applicable
  • Any anticipated linkage of biological materials with information about the participant
  • The plan for handling results and findings, including clinically relevant information and incidental findings
  • The participant’s right to request the withdrawal of data or human biological materials, including any limitations on the feasibility of that withdrawal

See Chapters 3 and 12 of the G-TCPS2 for detailed consent requirements for human biological materials.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

(A) (Guidance) CIHR Best Practices for Protecting Privacy in Health Research (September 2005)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Government of Canada

REQUIREMENTS

(1) (Guidance) Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (G-TCPS2) (December 2014)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

Relevant Sections: 3 and 12

Please help us understand our users better by providing your organizational affiliation.
Thank you for providing your affiliation information.
OMB #: 0925-0668
Expiration Date: 2/28/2019